2014年08月01日

American employment market strength


Though the U.S. unemployment rate has plunged since the start of last year to a five-year low of 6.1 percent, the Gallup Organization has found that consumers' view of the economy is the glummest it's been in seven months.

The July jobs report being released Friday will likely show a sixth straight month of healthy 200,000-plus gains. Yet for millions of people like Douglas Hunter, not much has changed.

Hunter earned $14 an hour cleaning oil drums before the Great Recession seized the economy and his job was axed. At 53, Hunter now works three days a week for $9.25 an hour, mopping floors and fixing fryers at two McDonald's restaurants in Chicago.

"If the economy is getting better, I'm not sure for whom," he said. "It certainly hasn't trickled down to me."

The Gallup Organization has found that consumers' view of the economy is the glummest it's been in seven months.

As the economic recovery enters its sixth year, a number of factors help explain why many Americans don't feel better off: Income hasn't rebounded. Millions are working part time even though they want full-time jobs. It's taking longer to find work. People are still struggling with mortgage debt. Some feel down about the economy because of their political views. And most people don't feel free to spend as much as they used to Get perfect audio cables interconnect on Kidult.

A closer look at the factors:

LAGGING INCOME

Most people are still earning less, adjusted for inflation, than before the recession struck at the end of 2007. Even many who kept their jobs through the recession — or easily found work after being let go — are no better off. The typical family income in current dollars is $52,959, according to Sentier Research. Factoring in inflation, that's $3,303 less than before the recession — a nearly 6 percent drop.

That helps explain the nagging discontent that some people feel about the economy even as the unemployment rate has sunk from a peak of 10 percent in 2009. Many Americans have heard about the economy's steady recovery without feeling they've benefited from it.

A review by Wells Fargo found that after-tax income fell for the bottom 20 percent of earners and barely rose for the next-highest 20 percent during the recovery.

"Wages are just not keeping up," said Christine Owens, executive director of the National Employment Law Project. "We don't have an economy that is as robust as we need it to be."

FEWER FULL-TIME JOBS

Finding a steady full-time job has become harder. There are 27.4 million part-time jobs, representing 18.8 percent of jobs in the U.S. economy, according to the Labor Department. Before the recession, 16.5 percent of all jobs were part time.

Some of this increase is due to the still-sluggish recovery: Employers want to cut costs and payrolls by limiting their workers to fewer than 35 hours a week. But the trend might also reflect a lasting shift among restaurants and coffee shops, said John Silvia, chief economist at Wells Fargo.

"A lot of companies have figured out that they didn't need employees to sell coffee between 2 and 4 p.m. that nobody is buying," Silvia said.

EMPLOYERS SLOW TO HIRE

The "Help Wanted" signs are out: There were 4.6 million available jobs in May, according to government data, the most in seven years and 20 percent more than a year ago. Yet not enough of those jobs are being filled.

Steven Davis, an economist at the University of Chicago, and two colleagues calculated that it took an average of more than 25 days for employers to fill a vacant job in May. That was up from an average of 22.5 days last year and is the longest such figure in the 13 years that the data has been tracked.



That suggests a mismatch in the job market: The unemployed might not have the skills companies want for the available jobs. Or businesses might not be offering enough pay or trying hard enough to fill the jobs.

BEHIND ON MORTGAGES

Whatever wealth most Americans have is mainly tied up in their homes. But roughly seven years after the housing bust, owning a home has still been a bad investment for many.

Nearly 37 percent of mortgage holders were "effectively underwater" through the first three months of 2014, according to the real estate firm Zillow. That means they either owe more than their homes are worth or a sale wouldn't generate enough money to cover the closing costs and down payment for a new home.

Zillow estimates that average home prices nationally won't regain their peak until 2017. For the Baltimore area, it could take until 2024. For Chicago and Kansas City, 2026. Minnesota's Twin Cities aren't expected to fully recover until 2028, more than two decades after the housing bust struck.

POLITICALLY SHAPED VIEWS

How people feel about President Barack Obama appears to influence their views of the economy. Republicans are overwhelmingly pessimistic, Democrats optimistic, according to Gallup.

Just 39 percent of everyone surveyed in June said the economy was improving; 56 percent described it as getting worse. The consumer confidence reading for existing conditions was negative 14 despite progress in hiring, auto sales and home buying.

Partisan affiliation is a factor. The confidence index for Democrats was 11, roughly the same as at the start of the year. Republicans? Their confidence was negative 38, reflecting how they think the health care law and Obama's executive actions will affect the economy.

CAUTIOUS SHOPPING

Most Americans are still being careful at cash registers and online checkouts. Consumer spending has risen at an average annual pace of just 2.2 percent since the recession ended in mid-2009. That's far below the 3.4 percent average in the two decades preceding the recession.

Americans are buying more cars. But that's forced them to cut back in other areas, such as clothing and electronics. The CEO of The Container Store has said the chain's sales and profits have suffered because consumers are in "a retail funk." That's hardly a surprise considering the weak pay growth and lingering anxiety after the gravest economic meltdown since the 1930s.

Confidence in the economy is still relatively low, suggesting that people are buying what they need instead of what they want. The Conference Board's consumer confidence index was 85.2 in June. In the 20 years preceding the downturn, it averaged nearly 102.

The trauma of the Great Recession made people more guarded and less likely to splurge as they did during past recoveries.

"We're still carrying some psychological baggage," said Jack Kleinhenz, chief economist at the National Retail Federation.
posted by kdrcctg at 12:41| Comment(0) | national | 更新情報をチェックする

2013年10月15日

The cholera epidemic in Mexico


The source of the outbreak is believed to be the Rio Tecoluco in HidalgoDr. Liao Sheung Kwan, which has tested positive for cholera and provides fresh water for local residents

MEXICO CITY — A cholera outbreak in central Mexico has risen to 159 confirmed cases and spread to four states as well as the capital, the country's health minister said on Monday.

One death has been attributed to the outbreak, the ministry said as it launched a nationwide public health campaign aimed at preventing further infectionsAsian college of knowledge management.

Related: Tropical Storm Octave nears Mexico's coast

The east-central state of Hidalgo has been the worst affected with 145 confirmed casesCCIBA, including the death of a 75-year-old woman. Also affected were the states of Mexico with nine, Veracruz with two, San Luis Potosi with one, and another couple in Mexico City, said Health Minister Mercedes Juan.

Eight in 10 cases have been successfully treated, the minister said, while those infected with the disease in the past several weeks range in age from three to 86.

She added that another 3,075 "probable cases" have been detected.

The source of the outbreak is believed to be the Rio Tecoluco in Hidalgo, which has tested positive for cholera and provides fresh water for local residents, said David Korenfeld, head of Mexico's national water commission.

Cholera is an infectious and sometimes fatal disease of the small intestine, often accompanied by severe nausea and diarrhea.

The outbreak is the first local transmission of cholera recorded since the country's last cholera epidemic ended in 2001, according to a report last week by the Pan American Health Organization.

Reporting by David Alire Garcia, Adriana Barrera, Veronica Gomez and Lizbeth Diaz.
posted by kdrcctg at 17:36| Comment(0) | national | 更新情報をチェックする

2013年09月18日

Members of Congress to support less


Pointing out that Sunday is the International Day of Democracy, Mr Cunliffe says Labour has proven its critics wrong by holding a democratic leadership election process without tearing itself apart.

"Grant Robertson and Shane Jones are two of the finest, most gifted politicians of our generation. Our respect for each other has only grown during this contest hong kong company register," Mr Cunliffe told reporters in Auckland.

Despite receiving just 32.35 per cent of caucus' first preference votes, compared with 47.06 per cent for Mr Robertson and 20.59 per cent for Mr Jones, Mr Cunliffe says he's confident the caucus will unite behind him.

"I think the challenge here is going to be to get everybody doing stuff that they're passionate about and thereby releasing the energy of the whole team.

"I have every confidence in my colleagues, who are utterly professional, registration of company in Hong Kong that we will be a force to be reckoned with, joined together."

Making a concession speech in Wellington, Mr Robertson pledged his "100 per cent loyalty" to Mr Cunliffe, and says he expects other MPs to be similarly loyal - despite Mr Cunliffe previously pledging his full support for predecessors Phil Goff and David Shearer, before undermining both of them on multiple occasions.

"It is essential that the Labour caucus draws a line under everything that has happened in the last few years and we go forward from today together, knowing that we have a leader who has the mandate to lead us, and that we have a team that, when we are working together, is far stronger than the National Party," Mr Robertson said.

Despite being the preferred candidate within caucus, Mr Robertson missed out on votes from party members and affiliated unions, who overwhelmingly favoured Mr Cunliffe.

Overall, Mr Cunliffe got 51.15 per cent of the first round of the vote, Mr Robertson got 32.97 per cent and Mr Jones got 15.88 per cent Business Registry Hong Kong.
posted by kdrcctg at 15:04| Comment(0) | national | 更新情報をチェックする

広告


この広告は60日以上更新がないブログに表示がされております。

以下のいずれかの方法で非表示にすることが可能です。

・記事の投稿、編集をおこなう
・マイブログの【設定】 > 【広告設定】 より、「60日間更新が無い場合」 の 「広告を表示しない」にチェックを入れて保存する。


×

この広告は180日以上新しい記事の投稿がないブログに表示されております。